LINKING NUCLEAR REACTIONS AND NUCLEAR STRUCTURE ON THE WAY TO THE DRIP LINES

5 Jun 2018, 14:00
18m
Kunibiki Messe (Matsue)

Kunibiki Messe

Matsue

Oral contribution Session 7

Speaker

Prof. Willem Dickhoff (Department of Physics, Washington University in St. Louis)

Description

The dispersive optical model (DOM), originally conceived by Claude
Mahaux [1], provides a unified description of both elastic nucleon scattering and structure information related to single-particle properties below the Fermi energy [2]. Extensions of this framework have introduced a fully non-local implementation for 40-Ca [3,4]. For the first time properties below the Fermi energy like the charge density and the presence of high-momentum nucleons can be included in the DOM description while elastic cross section data can be represented as accurately as in the local DOM implementation. Application of the non-local DOM to 48-Ca incorporates the effect of the 8 additional neutrons and allows for an excellent description of elastic scattering data of both protons and neutrons [5]. The corresponding neutron distribution constrained by all available data generates a prediction for the neutron skin of 0.249 +/- 0.023 fm for this nucleus [5] which is larger than most mean-field and available ab initio results.

We report on the most recent developments including a non-local DOM analysis for 208-Pb, an extension to heavier Ca isotopes, an analysis of the energy density in comparison with ab initio nuclear matter calculations, applications to (d,p) and (p,d) transfer reactions with DOM ingredients, and a reanalysis of (e,e'p) data to determine if experimental data can constrain the magnitude of absolute spectroscopic factors.

[1] C.Mahaux and R.Sartor, Adv.Nucl. Phys. 20, 1 (1991).
[2] W.H.Dickhoff, R.J.Charity, and M.H.Mahzoon, J. Phys. G: Nucl. Part. Phys. 44, 033001 (2017).
[3] M.H.Mahzoon et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 162503 (2014).
[4] H.Dussan et al., Phys. Rev. C 90, 061603(R) (2014).
[5] M.H.Mahzoon et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 119, 222503 (2017).

Primary author

Prof. Willem Dickhoff (Department of Physics, Washington University in St. Louis)

Presentation Materials